Music affects so much of my life, even listening to some music brings me to tears; I don’t know why, it just does!  Music is a massive part of my life.  I don’t profess to be a professional musician but I love listening to music, playing the piano, composing, teaching and helping others to gain confidence in leading early years music.

This blog has taken a lot of courage to write and share with you but I’m going to be brave and tell you my story. Why? Because music is slowly being pushed out of British education and I want to do my little bit to help keep it there!

I’m going to share something about myself that not many people know!

As you read in my opening paragraph, music is my passion and I believe it started in my early education.  Most of my early education memories are music based: songs, watching instruments being played, visiting performers/singers.  Music is what got me through the struggles I had at school; at secondary school I probably spent most lunchtime in the music room singing, playing the piano or composing.

What are those struggles?

All my life I have struggled with writing and spelling. In my adulthood the realisation that it might not be because I’m not ‘very bright’, as I’ve heard over the years, but it might be because I’m dyslexic has given me the confidence to push through the struggles I have.  This might sound weird but having a reason why you have been struggling for years to write a single sentence, whilst the people around you find it as easy as speaking, is a relief.  (It is national dyslexia awareness week in the UK in October.  Here’s the link if you would like to read more: http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/fundraising/dyslexia-awareness-week)

Writing this blog has taken years of self-educating as an adult: reading and then re-reading books about how language should be structured.  Plus getting over the fact that someone is going to read this and may make a judgment on my use of English; I now know that I make mistakes as does everyone!

Why do I continue to write even though it probably takes me 3 to 4 times longer than the average person?  Because I know how important music is in a child’s life and my mission is to help early years professionals who need help to ensure every child gets to explore music.

So, what and how is the relevant to you as an early years educator?

Everyone needs a chance to shine.  To know that they are good at something.  That they have a passion that lights them up and makes them feel happy.  For some it may be writing, painting, solving mathematical problems, understanding and helping others, sport…  and for others like ME, it might be music.

Music needs to be accessible to all children. I don’t mean music playing in the background but engaging children creatively through song and rhyme, listening, playing and experimenting with sound.  We can all do this even if we feel that we are ‘non-musicians’.  If you’re lacking confidence there’s lots of free help to be found in my blogs or my FREE online training course ‘5 Steps to a Musical Setting‘.  I also have online training courses for Baby Music and Magical Music Time.  If you would like in person training I can help there too!

To be able to shine musically our young children need models to show them how.  You are their model!  Be brave the children are not bothered about your singing voice they just want to sing and create music!  Just as I’m not a professional writer I continue to write, what I hope, are helpful blogs each week for early year professionals. GO FOR IT!

Happy music making!

Anne is a qualified teacher, musician, composer and mum! In 2008 she setup Musical abc to offer a LIVE music experience for children under 5. She continues to offer classes for the under 5s and also offers training for Early Years practitioners.